SCOPULARIOPSIS

SPECIES

MICROSCOPIC APPEARANCE

Hyphae septate, hyaline. Conidiophores with annellides hyaline or dark, simple or branched. Conidia hyaline or dark gray, unicellular, pyriform with truncate bases, smooth or rough walled, in chains.

MACROSCOPIC APPEARANCE

Surface: Texture velvety to powdery; white, cinnamon, grayish or black on surface.
Reverse: Yellowish to black.
Growth Rate: Rapid to very rapid growth.

DISTINGUISHING FEATURES

Scopulariopsis species are frequently isolated in the clinical laboratory. Unlike Penicillium , they produce pyriform conidia, typically with truncate bases. Scopulariopsis brevicaulis is recognized by its cinnamon colored colonies and its long cylindrical conidiphores, often clustered together in penicillus-like structures. Scopulariopsis brumptii is distinguished by its gray-black colonies and its short, swollen conidiophores.

HABITAT

Scopulariopsis are cosmopolitan, isolated commonly from soil. Certain species attack bee larvae and silkworms.

PATHOGENICITY

Rarely a cause of human infection. Onychomycosis is occasionally reported, while reports of subcutaneous and pulmonary infection are rare, and primarily concern the immunocompromised host with infection of soft tissue, bone, and lungs. Commonly considered a contaminant, but is known to infect the nails (usually toenail).

RECOMMENDED MEDIA

Incubate aerobically at 25 degrees C. for 2-7 days.

RECOMMENDED MEDIA

1. Hensyl, William R., et al. 1990. Stedman's Medical Dictionary , 25th ed. Williams & Wilkins, Baltimore, MD.

2. St. Germain, Guy and Summerbell, Richard, Ph.D. 1996. Identifying Filamentous Fungi , 1st ed. Star Publishing Company, Belmont, CA.

3. Larone, Davise, H. 1995. Medically Important Fungi , A Guide to Identification . 3rd ed. American Society for Microbiology Press, Washington, D.C.

4. The Oxoid Vade-Mecum of Microbiology . 1993. Unipath Ltd., Basingstoke, UK.


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