TRICHOSPORON

SPECIES

MICROSCOPIC APPEARANCE

Hyphae septate, hyaline. Rectangular arthroconidia are normally prominent, with pseudohyphae and blastoconidia present in fewer numbers, but the relative ratios vary. Appressoria (lateral swellings on hyphae that function that function in attachment) are variably present. Blastospores form and arthrospores form on older cultures.

MACROSCOPIC APPEARANCE

Surface: Texture moist and wrinkled; cream colored becoming black with age on surface.
Reverse: Cream colored becoming black with age.
Growth Rate: Rapid to very rapid growth.

DISTINGUISHING FEATURES

The genus Trichosporon is currently undergoing taxonomic reevaluation.

HABITAT

Trichosporon are part of the normal flora of the intestinal tract of man.

PATHOGENICITY

Superficial mycoses (white piedrea or trichosporosis) soft, white nodules over and around the hair shaft. Deep infections may either be localized or disseminated. Localized infections reported include endocarditis, meningitis, pneumonia, and peritoneal dialysis-associated peritonitis. Disseminated disease has developed in patients with hematologic malignancies, burns, and organ transplants with high associated mortality.

RECOMMENDED MEDIA

Incubate aerobically at 25 degrees C. for 3 days.

REFERENCES

1. Hensyl, William R., et al. 1990. Stedman's Medical Dictionary , 25th ed. Williams & Wilkins, Baltimore, MD.

2. St. Germain, Guy and Summerbell, Richard, Ph.D. 1996. Identifying Filamentous Fungi , 1st ed. Star Publishing Company, Belmont, CA.

3. Larone, Davise H. 1995. Medically Important Fungi, A Guide to Identification . 3rd ed. American Society for Microbiology Press, Washington, D.C.

4. The Oxoid Vade-Mecum of Microbiology . 1993. Unipath Ltd., Basingstoke, UK.


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